Yachats, Cape Perpetua and Heceta Head

Heading farther south along Oregon’s coastal highway 101, the weather finally shifted to a more typical fall pattern – misty and rainy.  The wind picked up a bit and the conditions suited the more rugged part of the coast around Yachats (pronounced “ya-hots”).  There’s a wonderful trail named “the 804” that runs right along the rocky shoreline, and you have to keep an eye on the waves if the tide is high and the wind is up – you can be swept into the sea if you’re not paying attention.The waves crashing on the rocks were mesmerizing, and we were sometimes startled out of our reverie by the WHUMP of a big wave that you could feel in your chest.  Sea birds were fishing in the surf, ducking under the biggest waves, and riding up and over the smaller ones.  It took me a while to identify them correctly, and they were (no surprise) Surf Scoters.  How these birds could successfully feed in those violent waves boggles the mind, but they kept at it for quite a long time.As with the rest of the coast, state parks and state recreation areas are everywhere – each a little gem with great views or a special natural feature.  On top of that the town of Yachats was charming and fun…Just a few miles down the road is Cape Perpetua State Park, with a number of hiking trails, an interpretive center, and some awesome shoreline features.  While waiting for the tide to rise we hiked to see the giant spruce tree – over 600 years old, standing 185′ tall and 40′ in circumference.The hollow under the tree was created by a “nurse log” – a dead rotting log that provided a rich medium for a little spruce seedling to grow on, and eventually the nurse log returned to the soil as this tree became the mighty specimen that it is today.

Other trees in the forest weren’t quite as big, but this one that fell across the trail was still pretty impressive.We drove up to a fantastic overlook, but the lashing rain and gusty wind made it impossible to take a photograph – we were more concerned about not getting blown off the cliff!  But as the rain eased and the tide came in, we climbed down by the craggy shoreline to see the Devil’s Churn and Spouting Horn.The Churn is a long narrow rectangular cut in the shoreline where the sea foams and flings itself furiously at the rocks.  There were some smaller similar formations all along that stretch, but my favorite was the Spouting Horn.  We watched the sea funnel into a narrow cut and when the waves were just right they were forced under the rocks and emerged as a violent spout of mist from a small hole.  Once again, it was mesmerizing.

About 10 miles farther down the coast is the Heceta Head lighthouse.Horizontal rain started back up so there were very few visitors, but the dauntless volunteers were dressed in full rain gear and were happy to show us the tiny museum and explain the highlights about this particular lighthouse.We were dressed pretty well for the foul weather, so we explored the little beach below the lighthouse, trying to imagine how the builders got the materials up the steep cliff to construct it. 

Once again, the pounding waves were fascinating, especially as they pummeled the short kelp-like sea palms.These little plants endured the most relentless assault from the sea, with tons of water repeatedly crashing on top of them, bending them but not breaking them off or tearing them loose.  We finally found one on the beach that we could look at more closely, but it’s sturdy constitution defies the imagination.

More Lighthouses

The Oregon coast is dotted with lighthouses, and we are diligently working on seeing as many of them as possible.  Next up: Yaquina Head lighthouse – a very picturesque spire near Newport, OR.  We got passes to take a tour inside the lighthouse, hefting the oil cans that the keepers had to haul up the stairs to keep the light burning before modern bulbs replaced the whale oil and kerosene, and seeing a slice of history in the keeper’s log book.We climbed the spiral stairs to the top, worth the effort to see the light mechanism and the massive first order Fresnel lens.Just below the lighthouse sea lions were hauled out on rocky islands, barking and cavorting in the waves just off a beach made of cobbles……basalt tumbled by wave action to a smooth rounded finish.  We hiked around the Yaquina Head promontory, enjoying views in all directions. 

Not to be confused with Yaquina Head, there is a small lighthouse to mark Yaquina Bay in the town of Newport.The tower just to the right of the lighthouse is a Coast Guard observation tower, actively manned, looking out towards the rock jetties protecting Newport’s harbor entrance.Like many of the other jetties that have been built at harbor entrances, this jetty helps to keep sand moved by ocean currents from building up and shoaling the inlet.  Wind sculpts the sand, making wave-like patterns in the beach dunes.We strolled the beach until the angled light nudged us towards the shops and restaurants on the working waterfront for some dinner.  We were drawn to the barking of sea lions, harbor residents perpetually napping or arguing about someone disturbing their nap.These are California sea lions, smaller than the beefy Steller sea lions we see at home in Petersburg.  But they behave much the same way – real characters!Newport is a pretty town with plenty of working boats to look at, a great aquarium, and a marine science center to explore.  With our background in diving and love of sea life, both spots were a favorite.You’re never to old to have a happy childhood!

A Little Glass Adventure

The town of Lincoln City, Oregon hosts the Finders Keepers event where beautiful blown glass floats are hidden on the town’s beaches for anyone to find.  We walked a lot of beaches looking for these treasures but never found any.  But since there are a number of glass art studios in the area we decided to take advantage of the chance to try our hands at making our own glass creations.For a fee, we were each allowed to “help” a professional glass artist make a float or a fluted bowl with colors that we chose.  We’ve watched demonstrations in glass blowing “hot shops” before and found the process fascinating, so it was great fun to get up-close-and-personal with it.

Starting with a “gather” of 2400 degree (F) molten glass on the end of a blow pipe, the artist adds color by picking up colored frit from a steel table.The glass begins to cool very quickly so it’s put into the “glory hole” to be reheated, fusing the colored frit into the gather.The process continues as the artist puts a small puff of air into the glass, allowing the moisture of his breath expand in the heat to form a bubble.  We repeatedly reheated the glass in the glory hole, and we blew more air into it, enlarging the piece and shaping it with a wet wooden form in between.Jim made a float, so the process for his project was just about complete at that point.  I made a fluted bowl, so the next step was to turn the hollow ball into a flat piece.  The artist took a hand torch and heated the end of the ball while I blew more air, until the weakened hot spot broke open.  He then heated it and opened it further.The final touch was to spin the flat plate at varying speeds and angles to create the fluted shape.

The pieces are finished by adding a glob of glass to form a flat base, then rushed to an annealing oven to cool slowly overnight.We had a blast learning a little more about glass and making some pretty creations to bring home to the boat.

It’s Not All Beaches

Oregon’s wild beaches are certainly beautiful, but we also love forests… and there’s plenty of those along the coast too.Douglas fir, red cedar as well as the more familiar Sitka spruce and hemlock tower over the ferns and the rest of the understory. A hike to see Drift Creek Falls featured a nifty pedestrian suspension bridge in the woods……and some unique mushrooms, among other pretty sights.We checked out the Tillamook State Forest Center, with neat interpretive exhibits about the history of the region and how the forest has recovered from widespread fires in the 1930s and 40s.  The center also had a pedestrian suspension bridge leading to hiking trails, and it was a nice spot to watch a little dipper bird fishing in the creek.  Ferns lined the hiking trails……and fall color made for beautiful reflections in the water.While the dominant fall color in the Pacific northwest is yellow, red is always my favorite.After getting a nice forest and fall color “fix”, we headed back to the coastline and beaches… I can’t even remember them all – there were so many!We decided that “too many beautiful beaches” is a great problem to have.We finished up with a late afternoon stop in the small town of Depoe Bay, watching gray whales blow and admiring the narrow inlet from the ocean into the protected harbor, where two Coast Guard 47′ Motor Lifeboats waited to assist anyone in trouble.